“Do I have to make every detail in fantasy fiction logical or acceptable?” #ThursdayTips

Well, I haven’t done this in a long time, so why not?quora-believable-fictionThis was where the excerpts came from: The Truth in Your Make-Believe.

Fellow fictionists, feel free to add in more tips!

 

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Sorry, I hadn’t been posting guys. There are just many things on my plate lately. But I promise to be a little more active again the next days…Toodles!

Four Tips From Seasoned Bloggers

In my line of work, I’ve already read much about blogging and have written stuff and tips about it as well. I have to say I don’t exactly follow them all, but that is because I have a different focus or different agenda, plus I am not that bothered about gaining a huge following, not yet anyway, Maybe someday, I’ll have more time and decide to be more active. That said, I think this post and tips from WordPress.com should work for anyone who is serious enough to be one of the best bloggers out there in the blogosphere. Congratulations to those whose names and blogs are mentioned. 🙂

WordPress.com News

Some of the best blogging advice we hear is from you. On Discover, we publish interviews and profiles of bloggers around the world, who also impart their own tips on how they’ve gotten the most out of WordPress.com. If you’ve missed these interviews, not to worry — we’ve compiled some of the best bits of blogging wisdom here.

Join communities that sustain your interests.

When you start to click around, follow blogs, and fill your Reader with posts to read, you’ll discover that WordPress.com is full of many smaller communities. For example, some participate in black and white photo challenges led by blogger Cee, while others join our multimedia Discover Challenges, hosted every Tuesday.

discover challenges

Novelist Claire Fuller credits two communities on WordPress.com for supporting and influencing her: Friday Fictioneers, a group of bloggers that writes a weekly 100-word story inspired by a photograph (hosted on the blog of Rochelle Wisoff-Fields), and The Prime Writers, a…

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When You Write, Walk Your Talk

walk-the-talk

Do you really know what you’re talking about?

There was an article I read on how good web developers should be. Based on the stuff the author wrote and considering that some visitors like myself were not as technology-savvy as he was, he did seem very credible about the subject.

A good web developer, he explained, should know this program, that software, most social media, and so on and so forth. He kept enumerating the must-bes and must-knows. He was an expert, nobody was about to contest that. Until he said that one needs to know English and, to emphasize, followed it up with “Did you born in the USA, UK, …….?” Uh, what? Say that again?

I paused and after a moment of comprehension, laughed. He definitely meant “Were you born…”

Considering how grammatically incorrect many of his statements were, I just knew he wasn’t kidding. It wasn’t for me to laugh at someone’s broken English. I laughed at the irony in what that particular non-native English speaker said. If he didn’t seem credible enough doing the technogab, my faith in him as an expert would have died.

Let that be our lesson. The first rule in writing is to write what you know – all of us writers, I suppose, have been made aware of that.  Evidently, he could use more practice to sharpen his communication skills.  It’s not about the English, really. That was circumstantial. It should have been about knowing his targeted audience, his medium, what to write and how to write about it.

If you want to give the impression that you  are experienced in certain fields, go ahead, share your knowledge. But know when to draw the line. Do not claim to know something you obviously are not good at. The least you can do is to have a field expert check your work before you click on “publish”.

You don’t just talk the talk, know what I mean?