It Came Storming In #MondayMemoirs

Facebook did well to remind me the other day about Glenda. Perfect for #MondayMemoirs.

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Two years ago, while I had not really recovered yet from my parents’ passing-away, Typhoon Glenda decided to add insult to injury.

I came home with a bruised and almost-cut upper lip from hurrying and slipping face-first on the pavement. It was disaster I came home to. The roof over my sister’s old room partially came off and was found in the neighbor’s yard. The ceilings leaked dirty-brown on the walls. The floors were flooded. Sheets and things were wet and stained for good. The gate was useless. The fence was completely down on the ground. Trees and all other debris were, too…

I wanted to cry. In fact, I was tearing up while my then-boyfriend/now-husband and I were trying to scrub all the dirt off the walls. I felt so sad for my parents who built the house for our family. I felt sad because there were still problems I was going through that my parents were not able to solve. I did not know how exactly to go from there. Thank God for my other half who made things a little bit easier and less lonely.

The effects of this event are still certainly felt until now. It led to a confrontation that I tried to avoid but had no choice–it was a matter I could not let pass, one of those important things my parents left unsolved. It led to more problems in the coming years, with people taking sides, bad-mouthing the “enemies”, back-stabbing the supposed “allies”, doing the same to me, or sometimes to the point of others trying to run my life (you know, if you don’t follow their advice/suggestion, or you so much as say a word to the enemy, you are labeled a traitor).

It didn’t matter that I didn’t talk to the other side because they said so and I was just trying to keep the peace, then I would find out they talked to the other side. Or that one kept saying she was mad at our allies and wasn’t talking to them anymore, but guess who keeps talking to them until now and sends to me their messages of disapproval of how my new family and I are doing things wrong all the time.

I wish Glenda never paid a visit. Maybe things still wouldn’t be solved, but maybe we would be in a lot less mess than this. The house has never been the same again. Just like me. We’re still trying to pick up the pieces.

 

 

“THE GREAT PHILIPPINE EXPERIENCE” #atozchallenge2014

NOTE: Ugh. I thought I scheduled this properly for the A-to-Z Challenge. Sorry…

 

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Megan Young, Miss World 2013

Lately, the Philippines has been getting positive attention, what with Filipinas currently dominating international beauty pageants. Several artists of Filipino blood, especially YouTube sensations that Ellen Degeneres and Oprah Winfrey got to have as guests in their shows, have somehow let the world know (well, those who got to watch, at least) that we are a race of generally good singers. Our white-sand beach, Boracay, has been consistently considered as one of the top beaches in the world. (See vids. First is singer Charice‘s as introduced to the world in “The Ellen Degeneres Show.” Second is a show featuring Boracay called “Ang Pinaka” [“The Most]”. You’ll understand most of it due to the visuals and alternating Filipino-English dialogues/narration)

And then just last year, the world witnessed how a tragedy that hit the country brought out the best in my fellowmen/women, with the spirit of what we call bayanihan (read as “buy-uh-nee-hun”) or communal unity alive and our propensity to still be able to smile despite the circumstances. I’d like to think that aside from or instead of the word coming from bayan, which means town or community, the root word is actually bayani, meaning hero.

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People from all walks of life gave donations and helped pack, sometimes even deliver, relief goods to the many Filipinos affected by Super Typhoon Yolanda last year

Still, these are not enough to erase the various stigmas that have been associated with our race. However, I would rather not think of the negatives, but of the positives. Much of the negatives have been borne out of racism, stereotyping and, in the recent case of people who claimed to be well-informed food  bloggers (yet they seemed too uninformed, misinformed and unprofessional-slash-unethical writers), utter clueless-ness.

I believe that I live in a GREAT nation that has the capacity to become GREATER, to rise from the ashes when Life has beaten us down time and again.

I want you to know more about my country. No, it is not to sugar-coat the negatives, rather to emphasize the positives. So let me share to you my article The Great Philippine Experience (to get there, please click on the title). I will hope that after reading, you’ll at least have a better impression of my country and my people. 🙂

 

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Did you like what you read and/or saw? If yes, then I’m happy. Thank you for reading! Feel free to comment below.

This post is a part of the …

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An Open Letter to CNN (just sharing)

I’m not feeling good and need to go home. Was going to shut down this laptop until I read the letter. So I decided to share it before I head for home.

A Filipino executive sent a letter to CNN. He says, “Last night, I listened to a CNN reporter wondering about the absence of night flights in Tacloban, in the context of the government not doing enough to bring in relief goods. It was like listening to newbie executives from Tokyo, London or the USA with no real international experience, yet assuming that their country’s rules and circumstances applied equally to the rest of the world. That was the proverbial last straw: I knew I had to react and call your attention to a few things.”

This is the FILIPINO EXECUTIVE’S LETTER TO CNN’s ANDERSON COOPER.

THESE CHILDREN NEED YOUR HELP

On October 8, 2011, I posted an article about this non-government organization and shared the article I wrote for them. I am saying this to let you know that SOS Children’s Villages Philippines is NOT a bogus NGO, in case anyone doubts immediately. I know they are real and I can vouch for them because I used to work for them. Anyway, I am really posting because this is the best way I can think of to be able to really help them in this time of need. Typhoon Yolanda (international name: Haiyan) has devastated the SOS Tacloban Village and traumatized the kids.

Filipinos and non-Filipinos alike, kindly send donations either in cash or in kind. The children especially need help. The Village is their family. They have gone through a lot in their young lives already and this is already too much! SOS Children’s Villages Philippines has been giving underprivileged kids homes they can call their own for more than 40 years. I know you might be helping Tacloban already, but I am still appealing for more hearts to send help as well to this Village.

This is their most recent update in Facebook, as of this writing:

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Kindly send donations for the sake of the kids living in the SOS Tacloban Village