Interview with a Komikero REWIND #AskWednesday

And we’re back!!! Got quite a lineup for interviews with a horticulturist, a singer, another martial artist, and hopefully, a dancer (she doesn’t know it yet, he he). Incidentally, I’ve noticed that so far, I’ve got all girls. I did send a message to one guy and because he doesn’t seem to be the active kind of Facebook user, he hasn’t yet seen my message at all. For today’s hash, though, I am sharing excerpts from my initial interview with comic book artist (komikero) Andoyman.

Andoyman, Andy for those of us who know him personally, is the owner of Andoyman Komiks (obviously) and the creator of ANG SUMPA, a local detective story with some forensics stuff thrown in. He’s been doing some other stuff and he currently draws for Rappler, too. A lot has happened since this interview so I will do an update interview sometime soon (he also doesn’t know this yet, ha ha!!!). Meanwhile…

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INTERVIEW WITH A KOMIKERO

masked-andoyman

Excerpts from the original interview:

J.Gi: “Andoyman”…Why Andoyman? Why not Andoy, or your nickname Andy?

Andoyman: Andoyman kasi ’yan yung itinawag sa akin nu’ng isa kong kaklase noong college noong humihingi siya ng favor sa akin. (“Andoyman was the name a classmate in college called me by whenever he asked for favors.”)

J.Gi: (So now we know he’s a pushover, but I won’t tell him that, at least not until I post this) How about your alter ego’s “caricature”? What’s with the farmer-look? And why the mask?

andoyman-farmer

This is the farmer-look

Andoyman: Farmer-look, ‘cause it’s simple, and my inspiration before was the picture in my first year high school Filipino book. There was a poem with it titled Takada ni Islaw Palitaw by Lamberto Antonio and that’s my favorite poem. Come to think of it, I just realized its significance. A farmer is hardworking and persevering in planting crops, patiently waiting for months for the harvest. Parang pagko-komiks lang. (“Just like making comics.”) So, for every drawing of panels, of characters, of places, of emotions, of the story on every page, it takes a lot of time, maybe days, weeks, months, years! That’s before you finally finish your comicbook, before you harvest.

As for the mask, I felt lazy drawing the face. Just three circles, voila! You’ve got a face – I mean a mask! At saka di ko lang trip magpakita nang mukha. (“And I’m just not keen on showing my face”)

J.Gi: Did you already know you were going to make comics when you were young?

Andoyman: Actually, no. My first dream was to become a doctor, then an architect, then an engineer. But all that time, I was already fantasizing about doing a comic novel.

J.Gi: When did you find out you wanted to really do this?

Andoyman: Several months after I graduated from college. The frustration of finding a job related to my course (degree) caused something to snap inside me. It made me cry and feel regret for not trusting the thing I loved to do with all my heart, the thing closest to my heart, and that was doing comics.

J.Gi: I just had to ask as it’s common knowledge that being an artist does not necessarily translate to getting a bigger salary. Di ba, there’s a term called “starving artist.” Do you believe that?

Andoyman: I believe all artists go through that stage…Sir Pol Medina, Jr. said (about that): Magpursigi lang kayo kasi magugutom kayo sa una, tiisin n’yo lang ‘yung gutom nang kaunti, at kung natiis n’yo ‘yun, ibig sabihin may passion kayo sa ginagawa ninyo. (“Keep on persevering though there will be hunger at first, bear with the hunger just a little bit more, and if you are able to bear it, that’s what passion for the craft is really all about.”) And I think every artist should remember what Sir Medina said.

andoyman-the-dream

J.Gi: You said you love to draw and tell stories. Which do you prefer more? and why?

Andoyman: Creating comics because I love both.

J.Gi: …you don’t mind doing collaborations with others writing the story instead of yourself?

Andoyman: Yes. For me, it’s exciting. I have actually done my first collaboration with my first idol in writing, Doc Ronibats. We did Palimos ng Kulangot (“Begging for Booger”) and was released and distributed for free during the Summer Komikon, then later posted online, on his website.

J.Gi: Kindred spirits having a mutual understanding…So which is harder, coming out with your own drawn story, or drawing somebody else’s ideas?

Andoyman: Drawing somebody else’s ideas, because they’re not my own in the first place. Somehow, I’d like that person to be pleased and satisfied with my interpretation of his words, of how I think he sees the story, and I want to give justice to his intentions and story.

J.Gi: Detective stories, mysteries…Can you tell us about this indie comics that you’ve been posting about for so long, you’re killing us with the suspense??? [Ed. We were talking about ANG SUMPA]

ang-sumpa

ANG SUMPA is a detective-mystery comicbook that dares to be different. Story and Art by Andoyman, Edited by SuperGi. Copyright © Andoyman Komikero

Andoyman: Ah, yes. It’s about the fictional President of the Philippines who is found dead in his private house with a few capsules of some sort of drug beside him. Everyone thinks he committed suicide. “But did he really commit suicide?” is the question in the mind of the protagonist, an NBI investigator as well as a childhood friend of the president. The mystery gets deeper and darker as he discovers secrets and conspiracies while one by one, his friends and people in power are dying, either through suicide or accidents.

J.Gi: What makes this different from the usual stuff you do?

Andoyman: Everything must be logical. The investigation, the crime, the events must be convincing then progressively suspenseful and exciting. This is not a one-shot comics, by the way. What makes it fun is it forces me to think hard and imagine what should happen next. That’s what I love about it, the thinking, the creativity that comes with the imagination. It is hard for a newbie like myself to do something like this, but I love everything about it. I love the challenge it brings.

J.Gi: Thanks for the interview and don’t forget me when you’re famous.

Andoyman: Who are you again?

J.Gi: Thanks, Andoyman!…I think.

imagination-is-the-limit

[Read the whole interview HERE]

 

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Hope you liked these excerpts.  Go ahead, click on the link above to see what else we talked about.In the spirit of transparency, and I have shared this several times already, I am the one editing the story of ANG SUMPA. And, BTW, all images copyrighted to him.

If you want to see more interviews, check out The NBSB Interview, where I was the interviewee, and The TKD Princess. More to come!

Un-Newbie-d (The Real Komikon Experience)

“I’ve been KONned.” There’s just no other way to say it. After more than a year of calling myself a Komikon newbie—worse, an (Almost) Komikon newbie’—I can now claim to be a real Komikon fangirl! Attending last April 13’s event at the Bayanihan Center in Pasig made sure of that.

summer-komikon-ticket

Some posts ago, I said I would not expect a real comics convention as much different from the comics festival I went to before, but it’s one of those rare occasions I’m thankful to be proven wrong. The Komiks Festival was cool and all, but the real Komikon…ROCKS! For starters, I was early enough at the venue, but what did I find? Already two long qeues to the building entrance. Later on, the place would be swarming with fans to feed their comic-hungry souls. My friend Sherwin was running late so good luck to him.

summer-komikon-comic-geeks

Whew!!! That’s just at the event entrance, lots more outside the building entrance, and lots more inside Bayanihan Center. Image from Komikon’s Facebook account

This just proved that Pinoy Komiks are NOT dead. Rather, quite alive and kicking. It was overwhelming to see a lot of geeks convening in one place (hey, don’t be offended by the geek-label, remember I was there, too, to enhance my geekiness). More overwhelming to know that thousands support the growing, new comics industry.

I almost made another mistake, what I call ‘Gayda Moment.’ Years ago, I absent-mindedly smiled and nodded a hey-there to a very familiar face only to realize it was Toni Rose Gayda, who didn’t really know me, and whom I never really personally met. Poor woman didn’t know how to react, trying to place me. So I almost made a fool of myself once again last Saturday, about to smile and nod a hey-there to Gab Chee Kee of the famous Parokya ni Edgar. Wow, ‘feeling-close’ naman ako. Funny, but I ended up following him in line. I could only hope no eager paparazzi took secret photos of him, a girl at his back looking silly like she was about to go to the beach with her large native bag, not attending the convention.

Once I got my ticket back with the stub removed, received my first set of freebies, and had the Summer Komikon logo stamped at the back of my right wrist, I proceeded to the lobby where I consumed a free Slurpee for breakfast (hey, I was in a hurry!). Shamelessly accepted, too, a The Hobbit Slurpee tumbler give-away (excess from when the movie was shown, but who cared? I love souvenirs). There were some non-comicbook goods being sold already right at the lobby but I didn’t want to splurge on them when I hadn’t even bought comics first.

create-own-comics-character

A young comics enthusiast checks out the exhibit on the various Character Making Contest entries

Facing the actual event area, I found on the right an exhibit of the Character Making Contest entries that had “Bata ang Bida!” (loose translation: “Kids Rule!”) as this year’s theme. Boy, a lot of them actually had promise. I would’ve checked out every one to have my own bets, but I told my friend, Andoyman Komikero, I was going to his table at the Indie Tiangge so I thought I’d just come back later (I forgot, though, but here are the winners: Character Making Contest 2013 winners).

So! Where was the Indie Tiangge section? I knew it was supposed to be separated from the main hall itself, but there didn’t seem to be anywhere else to go, but down a corridor that seemed too serious, I didn’t want to go where it could be off-limits. So I entered the hall.

Wow! Talk about crowded. There were lots of people and there were lots and lots of goodies to choose from. It was hard not to somehow touch shoulders with others or accidentally hit a display or two. Many popular titles and artists to choose from, too! I tell you I didn’t know where to start. So I just went around looking for Andoyman here, there, everywhere and I told myself to check outside again. It was a good thing because somebody, at last, posted a big sign now pointing to the direction of the Indie Tiangge, down the serious corridor. Ugh.

There he was! Finally! It had been more than two years when last Andy and I saw each other. Every communication–editing included–done through Facebook, texts and emails. I was glad to get actual copies of his Ang Sumpa (published under his Andoyman Komiks), especially because in a way, I was a part of it. I never knew I’d be doing anything related to comics. But now, let’s just say I’m thinking bigger things. We’ll see.

andoyman-and--komiks

Andoyman Komikero meets the Vidals of Ikos Komiks. That’s Andy, at left, with Ronzkie Pacho-Vidal sitting at the back, and Ray Vidal at our right

andoyman-komiks-sumpa

Andoyman Komiks. From left: The freebie Palimos ng Kulangot written by Doc Ronibats, Ang Sumpa 1 & 2, FOODCOURT, Andoyman’s baptism of fire

After some tête-a-tête and finding out there was no phone signal there, I went out to see any replies from Sherwin. He asked,“Wer n u? Nsa indi komiks tiangge k?” (“Where are you? At the Indie Tiangge?”) , to which I said yes and I would be waiting for him there. Then I spotted the Jonas Diego whom I last saw personally at the Festival; before that was yeeeeaarsss ago. Of course, we got to talk a bit and found we are just practically neighbors in Makati. I asked for issue 2 of his Pocket Comics, unfortunately, it was/is still a negative.

ikos-komiks-comics

The Ikos Komiks. They’re a variety of things–for kids, love stories, fantasies, action, drama, horror even (I am hazarding a guess here)

After a while, I went back to the Tiangge. Andoyman introduced me to the peeps next to him, Ikos KomiksRonzkie Pacho-Vidal and Ray Vidal. Their third member, Anino Karimlan, was not there. Ronzkie got to discuss with me their production and comic outputs. I’ve got to say I was initially attracted to their works visually. Then I got to flip through the pages and, through more explanations from her, I decided I wanted to buy at least two first. Based on what I’ve seen and read later on, I know Ikos Komiks is quite a group to watch out for. I am officially a fan.

As freebie, Ray gave away copies of the poetry book Utterly Woman: Lyric Poems, which, with one look, I immediately knew wasn’t new. Confirmation was when I asked and he said the writer, Lourdes H. Vidal, is his grandma. No problem. I love poems, and I actually considered myself lucky getting such a book for free. There was no other poetry-lover there more thankful.

Moments later, I met up with Sherwin at the lobby, and he was already wearing a Jake the Adventurer hat—to join his Picachu and Stitch hats in the office—that he just purchased from the event area. The Tiangge area was where we first devoted a lot of our time. It was a much smaller place but talent there was just as full and brimming.

I swear, it was somewhat a heartbreaking experience. Imagine, wanting much, much more with much, much less budget. Well, c’est la vie (that’s life). I had to balance between treating myself once in a while and still keeping it practical.

I have to admit, the main reason I bought Macoy Tang‘s Ang Maskot comics was my curiosity about its story, given that according to the woman at the table (I didn’t ask how they are related), it has been translated into film that’s about to be viewed at the coming Cinemalaya. I’m a sucker for indie films so I just had to know what Maskot was all about. The trailer, I just read online a few days ago, was actually shown at the Komikon, and I missed it. But reading the comics first made me agree that it was definitely movie-material.

macoy-tan-maskot-school-run

Macoy Tang modeling not his works but the ‘freebie’ (LOL!). He’s got loads of work and I must say, his School Run would be great to make a movie out of as well. Sali ako, p’wede ‘ko zombiiieee!!!!

my-friend-sherwin

Sherwin the Kraken enjoying his Slurpee. At his back is the almost-inconspicuous tarp on which are printed, among other things, the events of the day and–hello!!!–the event floormap…pffft…And, oh, found out the other day the map was also included in the first freebies at the event entrance. Toinks!

Fast-forward to us finally moving to the great hall. Yipes! More people! There was a hotdog-eating competition going on onstage and I laughed at how sincere Sherwin sounded when he said he really wanted to join. Just like me, he was hungry already, and he wouldn’t be called ‘The Kraken,’ too, for nothing. He’s got a black hole for a stomach!

Sherwin had a blast catching up, so to speak, with some artists he met at a past Komikon, particularly Pop U band members whose vocalist, Ker Floria, drew comics (Indie) as well and gave away a CD before as freebie (I liked some of the songs).

Sherwin bought copies again, too, of FUM (Filipino Utilized Manga). We got to meet the peeps behind the Filipino Manga mag. I’ve had my clear favorite so far from before, Rui Chan‘s Enguard, plus I was/am waiting for any actual storytelling of Legends of Maya, I think by Doc RaCe.

Meanwhile, I was so thankful for the Komiks Festival for I didn’t have to fall in line anymore (what a line it was and it’s said long lines are always expected with him around) at the Summer Komikon just to have Manix Abrera sign my copy of any of his books.

FUM-mag-team

The FUM Team, from left: Doc RaCe, Rui Chan, (sorry we didn’t catch the name of the next one), Freya Dy, and I think the last one’s Kasamaan, if I’m not mistaken

FUM-mags

From top, clockwise: New issues of FUM mags Breve and Latte versions, Bargitte version and a ‘One Shot’ comics called Anti-Hero as freebies, and cartoonized bookmarks and sticker as freebies as well

I saw Johnny Danganan, too, handling the auction table where various artists donated their masterpieces for a good cause. It was for the annual “Lapis at Papel” (“Pencil and Paper”) Project where proceeds were to go to a charitable cause, to help out underprivileged kids and supply school items to them for the coming school year. Artworks donated by artists were auctioned with bids starting at P500. Kudos for the efforts, guys!

komikon-lapis-papel-auction

Johnny Danganan and Jonas Diego at the auction table. Image from  Jonas’ Facebook account, posted by Mr. Rodrigo T. Andres, Jr. (thanks, Sir!)

I went around and around also looking for Freely Abrigo but I only found him right when we were to go home. My companion had something to do and should’ve left an hour ago, while I was going home to the province, which explains the big bag.

foreign-guest-cartoonists

Singaporean guest artists also graced the event and were interviewed onstage, sharing their thoughts and experiences

We were so busy checking out the wares, we hardly took notice of the stage where a lot more things did happen, like a Moving-Up Graduation Ceremony (moving up meant graduating from the Indie Tiangge level), Singaporean artists Otto Fong and C. T. Lim gracing the event, actor Ketchup Eusebio promoting the Ang Maskot film where he played the title role, Bogart the Explorer also promoting a yet-untitled film in his supposed hero costume, other fun contests and, aaaww, a surprise marriage proposal.

Meanwhile, Freely wasn’t so free but was busy attending to people. I waited for some minutes but it was not enough. I looked at the table and found I already have copies of his comics, except any Kapitan Tog but, by then, no more moolah…Next time, Freely, next time.

Lots more comicbooks broke my heart. The only thing that got me going was the idea that some of those could be bought some other days from bookstores, and that I’d be seeing them again at the next Komikons. So next time, I’ll be on the lookout for them. I’ll make sure I won’t miss them like I did Elmer Damaso and his Cat’s Trail. Well we saw him there so I figured he was participating.

Between the two of us, Sherwin and I brought home enough loot to satisfy us. We share collections so we get to read each other’s comics anyway. In fact, I’m done reading everything from this batch of loot, as well as the other batch he got from a previous Komikon.

It was really a fun experience, something I won’t mind experiencing again. Till the next time, Komikon!

freely-abrigo-kulas

More than a year and still so Free-ly! You haven’t changed, Freely. First photo, taken by me, from Komiks Festival. Second photo from Freely Abrigo‘s Facebook account

nino-balita-espiritista

Ano’ng balita? It’s Nino Balita and the Espiritista! The “package” consisted of his comicbook plus a shortie, Ang Inuuod Kong Puso, and stickers. Not Bad. Got the cutest autograph, too, so far

Ronzkie-Pacho-Vidal-Ikos

Here’s a better look at Ronzkie Pacho-Vidal of Ikos Komiks with a patron (my guess). I would LOVE to have that paper-thingy of Asul! Copyright belongs to Ikos Komiks and the people behind it. Got this from their blog

Neox-Limosinera-Bulda

Half of the guys responsible for Neox, Tico Limosinero accommodated our queries at their table. The other one is Jomar Bulda

drop-dead-dangerous

Happy Lockjaw‘s Drop Dead Dangerous indirectly came highly recommended by a friend so I thought I’d check it out and get a copy myself of the first issue. Thanks to Chad Cabrera for signing on the cover real nice and neat. Didn’t get to meet Mike Banting, though…Can’t wait to get the next ish-es!

successful-komikon

Will you look at that?!! Blockbuster!!! Image copyright belongs to Jonas Diego

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NOTE: Were you there? Anything you can contribute? A blog post by you about it, maybe? Just let me know and I will link to it 🙂

NOTE 2: Just some nice Summer Komikon-related blogposts — Summer Komikon 2013 Report by the great Mr. Gerry Alanguilan (you have GOT to read this and watch the vids, too!)Komikon 2013: Pinoy Comic Artists and Fans Converge at the Bayanihan Center in Pasig (feast your eyes as well on all the audio-visuals here), The Boys of Summer Komikon, Why Summer Komikon 2013 was a blast (the only thing I disagree with it is the Komikon supposedly being quite child-friendly; friendly enough, yes, but there are lots of comic books that do require parental guidance when being read by kids)

NOTE 3: All photos by Sherwin and myself, except when indicated otherwise.

 

Interview with a Komikero

It was not really clear to me what his job description was except he took care of the graphic stuff at the office where we both worked before. It was not easy to place him because he seemed to be the silent, serious type one moment, the office clown the next. We didn’t really hit it off considering that we were both on the creative spectrum of the small company (I was writer-editor). One day at lunch, I overheard him and some others discuss about the drawing or cartooning workshop he was attending and I joined in the discussion.

That was the start of our occasional tête-à-têtes. I got him more interested in the world of forensic science (my interest), he got me more interested in comicbook-making. He shared an idea for a comicbook he wanted to work on, on which he wanted my “forensic” opinion. He started work on it in 2011 and now, our little exchanges have led to a sort-of collaboration. “Sort of” on account of it being his brainchild and his visual artistry. I provided a so-called expertise owing to the fact that I’ve been a forensics-crazy fictionist longer than he has.

But that’s really jumping ahead. Meanwhile, I thought I’d introduce this up-and-coming artist more to the world and take credit for being the first one to interview the guy in case he becomes famous *wink, wink*

andoyman komikero cartoonized

The artist likes to use this supposed cartoonized version of his alter ego, Andoyman Komikero. Image Copyright © Andoyman Komikero

J.Gi: “Andoyman”…Why Andoyman? Why not Andoy, or your nickname Andy?

Andoyman: Andoyman kasi ’yan yung itinawag sa akin nu’ng isa kong kaklase noong college noong humihingi siya ng favor sa akin. (“Andoyman was the name a classmate in college called me by whenever he asked for favors.”)

J.Gi: (So now we know he’s a pushover, but I won’t tell him that, at least not until I post this) How about your alter ego’s “caricature”? What’s with the farmer-look? And why the mask?

Andoyman: Farmer-look, ‘cause it’s simple, and my inspiration before was the picture in my first year high school Filipino book. There was a poem with it titled Takada ni Islaw Palitaw by Lamberto Antonio and that’s my favorite poem. Come to think of it, I just realized its significance. A farmer is hardworking and persevering in planting crops, patiently waiting for months for the harvest. Parang pagko-komiks lang. (“Just like making comics.”) So, for every drawing of panels, of characters, of places, of emotions, of the story on every page, it takes a lot of time, maybe days, weeks, months, years! That’s before you finally finish your comicbook, before you harvest.

As for the mask, I felt lazy drawing the face. Just three circles, voila! You’ve got a face – I mean a mask! At saka di ko lang trip magpakita nang mukha. (“And I’m just not keen on showing my face”)

J.Gi: A-ha!…Shy???!!!!! If you’re so bent on keeping a low-profile identity, what’s up with that current human profile mug? Do you predict it will boost the sales of your comics???

andoyman komikero the artist

The “mug” in question. Hey, his pic, his copyright, okay?

Andoyman: My Facebook profile pic? He he. Just tripping…I do wish it boosts sales of my comics, ha ha!!!

J.Gi: Eeer…Okay…Now, MULTIPLE CHOICE. Many cartoonists/comics artists use aliases…

( ) because it’s cute…aaaww… =>
( ) because they can, so there, nyeh!!!
( ) as defense mechanism in case nobody buys their work and if anybody actually does, he can’t create a viral hate campaign against the artist
( ) I don’t know, I’ve never cared to ask
( ) because coming out publicly will have its dire consequences
( ) kasi trip-trip lang — walang basagan ng trip! (“just for fun – no killjoys!”)

Andoyman: (x) because coming out publicly will have its dire consequences”

J.Gi: Did you already know you were going to make comics when you were young?

Andoyman: Actually, no. My first dream was to become a doctor, then an architect, then an engineer. But all that time, I was already fantasizing about doing a comic novel.

J.Gi: When did you find out you wanted to really do this?

Andoyman: Several months after I graduated from college. The frustration of finding a job related to my course (degree) caused something to snap inside me. It made me cry and feel regret for not trusting the thing I loved to do with all my heart, the thing closest to my heart, and that was doing comics.

J.Gi: Closest to your heart??? HA HA HAAAAA!!!!!! From what I know, girls are the closest to your heart! ;p Has being an artist helped you get the girls?

Andoyman: Hahahaaa…(Editor: Nervous laughter…well, I could imagine nervous laughter…This interview was done via Facebook PMs) I don’t think so. Hehehe… (Editor again: See? Nervous, thus the need for redundancy)

Ako ay may lobo... Art by Andoyman Komikero

While what usually comes to my mind when I hear “komikero” is comedian rather than comics artist, I often find Andoyman’s work quite sentimental. This particular drawn rendition reminds us of our childhood and we sing that time-old children’s song, Ako ay May Lobo. I mean, what regular Filipino kid hasn’t had a balloon escape from his grasp and didn’t feel that innocent sadness upon realizing his loss? Image Copyright © Andoyman Komikero

Philippine justice denied...Art by Andoyman Komikero

Andoyman is not oblivious to political and social ills either, as can be gathered from this panel. Image Copyright © Andoyman Komikero

J.Gi: So what happened to your dreams? to Doctor, Architect or Engineer Andoyman?

Andoyman: I just loved to draw and tell stories. Plus I didn’t like memorizing all those difficult medical terms, or computing numbers…Too troublesome for someone like me. Unlike drawing and writing stories where I am free to explore through imagination, to take an amazing and unexpected journey inside my universe and share the stories I have collected.

J.Gi: I just had to ask as it’s common knowledge that being an artist does not necessarily translate to getting a bigger salary. Di ba, there’s a term called “starving artist.” Do you believe that?

Andoyman: I believe all artists go through that stage. I would like to re-tweet what Sir Pol Medina, Jr. said about that: Magpursigi lang kayo kasi magugutom kayo sa una, tiisin n’yo lang ‘yung gutom nang kaunti, at kung natiis n’yo ‘yun, ibig sabihin may passion kayo sa ginagawa ninyo. (“Keep on persevering though there will be hunger at first, bear with the hunger just a little bit more, and if you are able to bear it, that’s what passion for the craft is really all about.”) And I think every artist should remember what Sir Medina said.

J.Gi: (And I should have remembered to tell you this is WordPress, not Twitter. You don’t ‘re-tweet’ in WordPress, LOL.) Passion! That’s very important. You can’t call yourself an artist if you’re not passionate about your art. In a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being the highest. What rate would you give yourself? How passionate are you about this craft?

Andoyman: Hmnn…To be honest, I give myself a 6 because I’m still not that committed to my passion. I still tend to complain a lot – though I keep it to myself. I’m easily distracted, out-of-focus, and lazy. Hehe. “I am still my problem. XD

J.Gi: You said you love to draw and tell stories. Which do you prefer more? and why?

Andoyman: Creating comics because I love both.

J.Gi: Not fair, playing safe! Okay, let’s rephrase the question. If you were left with no other choices except to draw and to tell stories, which would you choose?

Andoyman: Hahaha.

J.Gi: ‘Cause while they work together, they’re still two different things!

Andoyman: Hmnn…Okay. It would be drawing since it’s my first love.

J.Gi: So you don’t mind doing collaborations with others writing the story instead of yourself?

Palimos ng Kulangot. Story by Ronibats, Art by Andoyman Komikero

This comicbook, “Palimos ng Kulangot,” is a collaboration between Andoyman Komikero, the cartoonist, and Dr. Ronnie Baticulon a.k.a. Ronibats, the storyteller. Click on the link to see and download the comicbook’s PDF for free. Meanwhile, read the whole story HERE,

Andoyman: Yes. For me, it’s exciting. I have actually done my first collaboration with my first idol in writing, Doc Ronibats. We did Palimos ng Kulangot (“Begging for Booger”) and was released and distributed for free during the Summer Komikon, then later posted online, on his website.

J.Gi: (Title is eeew-much., but I did get to read it before and it actually has sense and real meaning. Good thing.) So how did this collaboration happen? From what I understand, he wrote the story long before you drew it.

Andoyman: When I commented on his (Ronibats’) post, he had just gone back to writing again after a long absence from the blog world. Then he said he should create comics and of course, I said yes. It was really unexpected. He asked me what story I wanted to work on and I decided on Palimos ng Kulangot because it was the first story I ever read from peyups.com, how I was introduced to his writing.

J.Gi: Kindred spirits having a mutual understanding…So which is harder, coming out with your own drawn story, or drawing somebody else’s ideas?

Andoyman: Drawing somebody else’s ideas, because they’re not my own in the first place. Somehow, I’d like that person to be pleased and satisfied with my interpretation of his words, of how I think he sees the story, and I want to give justice to his intentions and story.

J.Gi: What kind of stories do you like to create? I’ve read your first comicbook, FoodCourt, and I thought it mirrored you a bit, the hopeless, shy romantic. Most comics artists draw manga or superheroes nowadays so I thought you would, too.

Andoyman: Yes, Foodcourt is me. About a guy who likes to daydream. I actually can’t see myself doing superheroes and even doing manga. I really want to create a comicbook that I can proudly say is my story, my creation. I prefer to do detective stories, mysteries, unusual love stories, stories for children and for all ages, comedy even though I’m corny, he he,…Stories that, though not necessarily dramatic, touch the hearts of people from all walks of life and make them tear up a bit.

Andoyman Komiks Foodcourt and Sumpa

Andoyman Komikero’s (1) first offering, and (2) well, a teaser of his work in progress

J.Gi: Detective stories, mysteries…I heard you were creating something of the sort? *uh-hurm* Can you tell us about this indie comics that you’ve been posting about for so long, you’re killing us with the suspense???

Andoyman: Ah, yes. It’s about the fictional President of the Philippines who is found dead in his private house with a few capsules of some sort of drug beside him. Everyone thinks he committed suicide. “But did he really commit suicide?” is the question in the mind of the protagonist, an NBI investigator as well as a childhood friend of the president. The mystery gets deeper and darker as he discovers secrets and conspiracies while one by one, his friends and people in power are dying, either through suicide or accidents.

J.Gi: What gave you this idea for a story?

Andoyman: Because of Death Note, I think. Having read it, it inspired me to create something that defines good and bad. My first idea was to have a killer come from an alternate universe, but my comics workshop teacher laughed at it. I changed my whole story’s approach, drew a web diagram of its plot, and voila, that’s it. Then it grew on its own.

J.Gi: What makes this different from the usual stuff you do?

Andoyman: Everything must be logical. The investigation, the crime, the events must be convincing then progressively suspenseful and exciting. This is not a one-shot comics, by the way. What makes it fun is it forces me to think hard and imagine what should happen next. That’s what I love about it, the thinking, the creativity that comes with the imagination. It is hard for a newbie like myself to do something like this, but I love everything about it. I love the challenge it brings.

J.Gi: Will we get to see it soon during comics conventions?

Andoyman: Unfortunately, no. Financial matters. But everyone will be able to read it online soon.

SUMPA cover. Story and Art by Andoyman Komikero, Edited by SuperGi

SUMPA is a detective-mystery comicbook that dares to be different. Story and Art by Andoyman Komikero, Edited by SuperGi. Copyright © Andoyman Komikero

J.Gi: Who influenced you to make you really consider becoming a comics artist?

Andoyman: It was more due to the Shogun Comics that I read and animes I saw when I was a child. It was like, “I want my story to be on comics, and published, and read by people” or “I want my story to be an anime someday.”

J.Gi: Ten years from now, do you see yourself doing comics full-time?

Andoyman: YES.

J.Gi: Do you think the comics industry will continue to improve?

Andoyman: Of course, yes. New talents means new stories and new audiences. It just needs more exposure.

J.Gi: Okay, since I can sense that you’re already sleepy ‘cause I’m clairvoyant that way, last question: what is your biggest, personal dream in this new and exciting endeavor into the world of comics?

Andoyman: To become a full-time comics creator and support myself through my works.

J.Gi: Thanks for the interview and don’t forget me when you’re famous.

Andoyman: Who are you again?

J.Gi: Thanks, Andoyman!…I think.

Andoyman Komikero waves goodbye

Find Andoyman Komikero  here at WordPress. See more of his works at DeviantArt (he used to be at i.ph where he put most of his stuff, but that site closed down) — lately he’s been doing lots of doodling and experimenting with TitusPens. Catch him as well on Facebook, Tumblr, and I think he’s got a Twitter account as well.

Our friend is quite elusive but he does attend comics conventions once in a while.

See you all at this Saturday’s Komikon (October 27, 2012), guys!!!