“TREACHERY” #atozchallenge2017

I realized that though this is Poetry Month, I haven’t really shared any new poem of my own save from the very short ode that wasn’t really an ode. Now this is not exactly new, but I have not yet shared it here. Now a little background…

A lot of my poems have a contemplative feel, but many do have a sad, wounded, if not angry feel to them. That is because they are often unintentionally based on my experiences and on stuff that make me sad. For some reason, I seem to be inspired to write out my feelings more in poetry form when some things bother me. This annoys me a bit, truthfully, but I am what I am.

So with this poem I wrote years ago, you can very much guess what “inspired” me. As for the backstory, it is mine to keep. Let’s just say that much earlier on, I knew already she was not to be trusted: she already betrayed two people and even my confidence once. I just did not see the next time coming. Pathological traitors are like that. She got me into trouble, so to speak, so she could save her own behind.

You know, I’d like to say I have forgiven this person, but I would be lying. I have a long way to go on the path I am trying to take.

TREACHERY

What treachery is this?
A betrayal that has no name.

You speak in riddles
but mostly in silence,
yet speak with praises
and feigned friendship
in the same breath.
Your lies and your secrets
and my seeming ignorance
blend perfectly well
in a murky, filthy brew…

…Or so you think.

I have long-ago recognized the stench
seeping from your very skin.
I have long-ago recognized my anger
and hatred for your deceit.

Do you think I am such a fool
to ever believe you?
Do you think I am so blind
not to see through you?

Ah. Maybe not. Still, you try,
hoping, praying (to what god?).
You may have won the battle,
but I will someday win the war.

What treachery is this?
I ask in anger.
Oh, but betrayal
does have a name—YOU.

Copyright © J.Gi Federizo

 

HAPPY POETRY MONTH STILL!!!

If you want to read more of my poems, you can find them at the POETRY NOOK.

 

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I hope you liked what you read. As said, there are more at the POETRY NOOK.

T is for “Treachery”

This piece serves as my Letter T post for the A to Z Challenge 2017.

Will link to my A to Z Challenge 2017 page soon. 😉

Beast-mode Poetry #atozchallenge2017

I owe much of my love for poetry to a certain TV series and actor Ron Perlman. Seriously.

In 1987, the series Beauty and the Beast (BATB) starring Ron and Linda Hamilton started airing. However, it did not immediately reach our shores, so to speak. Exactly when I saw it, I do not remember, although my guess would be in 1989. But its impact on me has lived with me since then.

It was a beautiful show and much of what made it beautiful to me, at least, was the premise of a “beast” with a golden voice always waxing poetic. He was a well-read creature always reading such lovely poems! And that voice!

Yes, that voice is forever embedded in my memory. That’s especially because when I reached college, someone introduced me to BATB’s Of Love and Hope official soundtrack. OF COURSE, I just had to borrow and listen to it. I did until I decided to have my own copy. Oh, bliss!!!

Ron really did justice to the poems. I fell in love with the poems. I hardly even remember the music, in fact, I often skipped the music to get to the poems! They were made more beautiful by his deep and romantic voice, romantic in the more sentimental way. I cannot read/recite any of those poems without being on “beast-mode” and reading them his way.

So if anyone ever notices why I watch some movies because Ron’s in it, it’s because I have somehow made him a friend.

If you miss the show and the poems, or would like to know what I am talking about, I have taken the liberty of finding videos for you where Vincent recites Cummings, Frost, Rilke and others. I tried to post them in an order based on what I most love, but there were those I could not decide on. So let’s just say they are in random order.

But first, the most popular audio from the show. This was the show’s theme song, The First Time I Loved Forever (sung by Liza Angelle). In-between parts are readings of excerpts from e. e. cummingssomewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond. The whole poem follows the video. BTW, the list is not complete as I could not find vids of the others.

somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond

somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond
any experience,your eyes have their silence:
in your most frail gesture are things which enclose me,
or which i cannot touch because they are too near

your slightest look will easily unclose me
though i have closed myself as fingers,
you open always petal by petal myself as Spring opens
(touching skilfully,mysteriously)her first rose

or if your wish be to close me, i and
my life will shut very beautifully ,suddenly,
as when the heart of this flower imagines
the snow carefully everywhere descending;
nothing which we are to perceive in this world equals
the power of your intense fragility:whose texture
compels me with the color of its countries,
rendering death and forever with each breathing

(i do not know what it is about you that closes
and opens;only something in me understands
the voice of your eyes is deeper than all roses)
nobody,not even the rain,has such small hands

She Walks in Beauty by Lord Byron (George Gordon Byron)

Acquainted with the Night by Robert Frost

Longing by Matthew Arnold

I Arise from Dreams of Thee by Percy Bysshe Shelley

This is the Creature by Rainier Maria Rilke

You, Darkness by Rainier Maria Rilke

That’s it. For sure, you loved them! I am virtually hugging Ron right now :>

And now, as bonus, we have here e. e. cummings actually doing a reading of his poem 🙂

HAPPY POETRY MONTH!!!

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Love poetry? Let us know what you thought of this! Which is your favorite BATB poem? Just drop a comment or two below.

P is for “Poetry”

This piece serves as my Letter P post for the A to Z Challenge 2017.

I am creating a page for my A to Z Challenge 2017 posts. Meanwhile, to check for my past posts, kindly check out As Lovely as a Tree. Not for any other reason except that’s where I last listed down my post titles.

 

Ode Things #atozchallenge2017

I believe that many have already encountered the word “ode”, but how many do know what it means? To define it simply, an ode is a lyric poem, or a poem meant to be sung. That was what I knew of it in high school. I became fascinated with the concept of it, so I wrote a very short one:

When I’m Gone

When I’m gone…

You may cry or grieve

Or look back to where the tears have been.

And when the crying is done

And the grief has gone,

Simply remember me

And smile…

For I’ll take that smile with me

…When I’m gone.

I have always been a sentimental soul, so it is no wonder I made this sentimental ode. It was actually inspired by quotes from Michael Landon and Michael Mills.

What is Ode, Really

I realize now I most probably broke a lot of the rules for writing an ode. Actual dictionaries define the ode as the following:

Merriam-Webster: “a lyric poem usually marked by exaltation of feeling and style, varying length of line, and complexity of stanza forms”

Oxford: “1. A lyric poem, typically one in the form of an address to a particular subject, written in varied or irregular metre 1.1. A classical poem of a kind originally meant to be sung”

Vocabulary.com: “a lyric poem with complex stanza forms”

Dictionary.com: “1. a lyric poem typically of elaborate or irregular metrical form and expressive of exalted or enthusiastic emotion 2. (originally) a poem intended to be sung”

At least, I got that last one right.

To further explain,…

“‘Ode’ comes from the Greek aeidein, meaning to sing or chant, and belongs to the long and varied tradition of lyric poetry. Originally accompanied by music and dance, and later reserved by the Romantic poets to convey their strongest sentiments, the ode can be generalized as a formal address to an event, a person, or a thing not present.” (Poets.org)

Or simply put,…

“An ode is a form of lyric poetry — expressing emotion — and it’s usually addressed to someone or something, or it represents the poet’s musings on that person or thing…” (Vocabulary.com)

The Ode Ones

The ode’s stanza forms vary. The Poetry Foundation website tries to explain these the easiest way possible (the quotes are from their page, the links aren’t mostly):

  1. The Greek or Pindaric ode – “celebrates athletic victories” (I am suddenly reminded of Whitney Houston’s One Moment in Time)
  2. Horatian ode – “written in quatrains in a more philosophical, contemplative manner”
  3. Sapphic ode – “consists of quatrains,…unrhyming but with a strict meter.”
  4. English Romantic ode“vary in stanza form. They often address an intense emotion at the onset of a personal crisis…or celebrate an object or image that leads to revelation.”

There are various examples of odes. The poet that seems to be mentioned most is John Keats. Below is an excerpt from one of the odes he is famous for (if not the weirdest one). Click on the image to read the whole ode and even listen to the audio.

More examples can be found HERE and HERE (10 Most Famous Odes by Renowned Poets).

Now that you know what an ode is, I hope this has inspired you to try writing one yourself.

 

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If you have written your own ode, do share! Maybe add an audio along with it? 😉

O is for “Ode”

This piece serves as my Letter O post for the A to Z Challenge 2017.

I am creating a page for my A to Z Challenge 2017 posts. Meanwhile, for now, to check for my past posts, kindly check out As Lovely as a Tree.

As Lovely as a Tree #atozchallenge2017

The poet Alfred Joyce Kilmer

Aside from little children who may not have heard it yet in school, I think no fan of English poetry has never heard of American poet  Joyce Kilmer‘s Trees. It may not have been the first English poem I ever encountered, but I remember being officially introduced to the English poetry in school through it. I remember being fascinated by the words and the imagery. I had hoped that one day, I could write something as simple yet beautiful as Trees.

Some critics hated the simplicity and sentimentality in his works, even inspiring parodies like Song of the Open Road by Ogden Nash. However, it is these same qualities that have endeared his most famous work to many.

Alfred Joyce Kilmer was a journalist, literary critic, lecturer, and editor. But he was best-known, perhaps, as a prolific writer and poet who loved to write about nature and beauty, even of his religious faith, all as evidenced by…

Trees

I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.
A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast;
A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;
A tree that may in Summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;
Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.
Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.
Having had his poem published in Poetry magazine in August 1913, it sealed his fate as one of the great poets of his time. He published Trees and Other Poems the year after, and went on to write more until he died in a battlefield in July 1918, hit by a sniper’s bullet.

 

 

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This post is still in observance of Poetry Month.

Finally, better connection again! Will have a lot of catching up to do! Keep visiting, guys! Oh, and I will visit you, guys, as well, that’s for sure 🙂

J is for “Joyce Kilmer”

This piece serves as my Letter J post for the A to Z Challenge 2017.

If you’re interested:

A for Alibata – How to Spell the Ancient Filipino Way

B for Block – “How do you personally deal with writer’s block?”

C for Contents – Contents with all the Feels

D for Dialogue – Why Dialogue is Important

E for Edit – Mark Your Words!

F for Fictional Characters – “Which fictional character that you created is your favorite, and why?”

G for Grammar – GRRRR-rammar!!!

H for Haiku – The Haiku

I for I Not Stupid – I Not Stupid (A Review)

The Haiku #atozchallenge2017

Haiku. A descriptive form of poetry originating from Japan and previously known as hokku. I believe that anyone who has ever been in school may already have an idea of what haiku is. If not,

“Often focusing on images from nature, haiku emphasizes simplicity, intensity, and directness of expression. Haiku began in thirteenth-century Japan as the opening phrase of renga, an oral poem, generally 100 stanzas long, which was also composed syllabically. The much shorter haiku broke away from renga in the sixteenth-century,…” (Haiku: Poetic Form)

Initially, one would think that haiku isn’t so hard, after all, it’s just short, right? Not really. For one, there are meters to consider. To come up with just a decent poem, one would need to be well aware of the rules of writing it: the allowed length (traditionally with three lines) and the number of syllables required (traditionally 17) . Because haiku is short, you would need great inspiration and a certain amount of skill to create powerful haiku verses. Simplicity is beauty, and not everyone has such skills to do it properly.

Matsuo Basho mastered the art in the 17th century and wrote this classic piece:

It is said that there are no real specific rules in haiku, especially nowadays. However, the structure remains the same. I share these points from YourDictionary.com in verbatim:

  • Only three lines, totaling 17 syllables throughout
  • The first line is only 5 syllables
  • The second line is 7 syllables
  • The third line is 5 syllables like the first
  • Punctuation and capitalization rules are up to the poet, and need not follow rigid rules used in structuring sentences
  • Haiku does not have to rhyme, in fact many times it does not rhyme at all
  • Some haiku can include the repetition of words or sounds

According to poet Ezra Pound, who promoted the modernist aesthetic in poetry, “The image itself is speech. The image is the word beyond formulated language.” See here:

The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
Petals on a wet, black bough.

For more samples, I have found these for you, haiku poets (some of whom I’m, at least, Facebook buddies with) and their masterpieces, in alphabetical order:

morning mist
texturing the canvas
of a dream

(Angelo B. Ancheta)

The sea darkens;
the voices of the wild ducks
are faintly white.

(Matsuo Basho)

dead widow’s bamboo bell
each chime numbs
the mind

(John Tiong Chunghoo)

The wind
Undecided
Rolls a cigarette of air

(Paul Eluard)

The low yellow
moon above the
Quiet lamplit house.

(Jack Kerouac)

we make things happen
we mirror lights and light stars
in stellar lagoons

(from the ‘We’ Haikus, Ute Margaret Saine)

In the coolness
of the empty sixth-month sky…
the cuckoo’s cry.

(Masaoki Shiki)

soft rain
a frog leaps from
one leaf to another 

(Santiago Villafania)

this moon
watching her dance
on the
shoreline as if
the stars exist

(Robert D. Wilson)

I wish I could share my own samples, but I don’t think they qualify as haikus. How about you share to us your own haikus instead? By the way,

HAPPY POETRY MONTH!!!

 

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I have not been feeling well for days, frankly. Forgive me if I seem slacking on the letters, I promise I’m not. Do please keep visiting 🙂

H is for “Haiku”

This piece serves as my Letter H post for the A to Z Challenge 2017.

If you’re interested:

A for Alibata – How to Spell the Ancient Filipino Way

B for Block – “How do you personally deal with writer’s block?”

C for Contents – Contents with all the Feels

D for Dialogue – Why Dialogue is Important

E for Edit – Mark Your Words!

F for Fictional Characters – “Which fictional character that you created is your favorite, and why?”

G for Grammar – GRRR-rammar!!!