“Do I have to make every detail in fantasy fiction logical or acceptable?” #ThursdayTips

Well, I haven’t done this in a long time, so why not?quora-believable-fictionThis was where the excerpts came from: The Truth in Your Make-Believe.

Fellow fictionists, feel free to add in more tips!

 

***************************************************************

Sorry, I hadn’t been posting guys. There are just many things on my plate lately. But I promise to be a little more active again the next days…Toodles!

Advertisements

4 thoughts on ““Do I have to make every detail in fantasy fiction logical or acceptable?” #ThursdayTips

  1. Such a good question! I would say no, you don’t have to make fiction believable. But that’s coming from me who reads fiction with the expectation of believing anything can be possible in a fictional world. To me, anything goes with fiction and when I read fiction, I want my imagination to run wild. It is interesting to hear you say you add truth to the make-belief when it comes to fiction. I think if you succeed in making your readers feel something or think about something in real life with fiction, then it’s a great piece 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Mabel!

      I am all about wanting my imagination run wild. At the same time, I don’t want sloppy work. I don’t need everything to be explained to me, but I don’t want to read anything that sounds stupid to me either, especially if the writer was just too lazy to do a bit of research and use more creativity.

      For instance, there could be a fake chemical element. I don’t need a genius writer to come up with a chemical solution that’s actually non-existent. But I do want him to sound believable enough when he explains.

      I kind of did this in my story: no real scientific mind is ever going to believe a mixture of holy water, garlic and salt could actually hurt, but I used the idea of acidic vs basic. The concoction is supposed to not affect humans, but it’s an acid that can hurt aswangs (monsters/ghouls), etc. After all, the belief is aswangs hate or are afraid of garlic and holy water, even salt. It’s always portrayed like these stuff burn them.

      “I think if you succeed in making your readers feel something or think about something in real life with fiction, then it’s a great piece.”

      Yup, that’s my point. If a writer gives me crap that doesn’t work (like crap works? he he), he doesn’t have the right to make “It’s fiction” as an excuse.

      Like

      • I think you are very right in saying no one wants to read about anything stupid. Or anything that tries to fictionlise and mock a sensitive topic like politics, religion, you get the picture. There are some kinds of fiction that will sit well, and some just don’t sit well with others if they don’t agree with the underlying message.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Very true. You have to make a little more effort, if you’re going to do make-believe.

          In addition to the sample I gave last, I made the concoction acidic to aswangs. But what should explain the acidic reaction? We get the idea of holy water, but what about garlic and onions? Then the answer lies on the aswangs. Considering that they’re supposed to be differently “made” from normal humans, there has to be something in their bodies that should react to the concoction chemically, something normal people don’t have…

          So I’m not being too factual yet there’s some hint of logic there. At least, that’s what I think 😉

          Liked by 1 person

Let Me Know Your Thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s